Geo016 - Exploration of Mars

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Geo016 / Exploration of Mars / (M) 3:00-5:20 / Lincoln Field 105 / Prof. James Head

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Stephanie LaRose (02/04/04)

The sciences have always been what fascinated me; mainly biology and geology. I have always kept up with the latest discoveries in these areas, including the Mars missions. When I got the email over the break about there being a new first-year seminar about Mars, I knew I wanted to take it. I believe I will be majoring in Geology-Biology, so this course fits in with that. We still don't even know a lot about the early history of our planet, and by looking at other planets, it will give us an insight into what our planet may have gone through.

I would definitely be interested in the question of life on Mars. I am convinced that there is life on other places than Earth, but I am not sure whether it would be on Mars or has ever been. Missions like these will hopefully make that clear to us.

Learning about all the history of the exploration of space will also interest me. The fact that it took a competition to get a major interest in space going is a true testament about the way humans go about things. With this in mind, it is amazing that we have the international space station and are doing other joint missions now. I hope that this continues into the future and that we discuss this in the class.

Since at least the Pathfinder mission I have tried to keep up on the latest discoveries about Mars. Simply reading the information in a newspaper does not give one the full picture and scope of what is happening, though. Looking through the actual data the scientists receive will give me a better understanding of how these things are analyzed and I think that would be interesting to be exposed to. I would like to contribute any thoughts I have on the geology and biology of the data.

 

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