Geo016 - Exploration of Mars

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Geo016 / Exploration of Mars / (M) 3:00-5:20 / Lincoln Field 105 / Prof. James Head

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Daniel Finn-Foley (02/04/04)

As trite as it may sound, science and exploration have always fascinated me. As a child I took in as much scientific information as I could find, from books, teachers, and even programs like NOVA on TV. I went on personal trips into the woods to find out what animal was making strange noises (the culprit turned out to be a hoard of small frogs in breeding season), and picked pieces of pottery off the beach while others went swimming to see if I could reassemble an entire vase from some ancient vessel that may have passed near my home some centuries ago.

As a teenager my interest in exploration turned into a love of science, and I avidly took as many science classes as I could. When it came time to choose what class I would take my senior year I chose Physics simply because all my friends were in it, not because I had any real interest in it. But during that class with the help of a great teacher I grew to love physics and found out I had a knack for it. I have since continued my interest in physics at Brown, already taking an introduction to Mechanics and an Astronomy course.

This seminar caught my interest by rekindling my dormant love for exploration. As much as I have loved science, I loved finding answers to my own questions that much more. But one cannot rediscover Newton's laws, so while I find physics fascinating, I want something fresher.

The chance to explore Mars with some of the last true explorers left is an opportunity I could not pass up. I hope this course will allow me to be a part of history, and be one of the first to discover something completely new.

 

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