Geo016 - Exploration of Mars

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Geo016 / Exploration of Mars / (M) 3:00-5:20 / Lincoln Field 105 / Prof. James Head

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Boyoun Choi (02/04/04)

In middle school, I started getting really into general science area. One of my teachers recommended me a science magazine called “Newton.” In the book was endless information that I would never have chance to learn from school. I was then interested in chemistry and physics, but the magazine opened my eyes to the world of astronomy. Everything was so grand and astonishing that I even got to have some respect towards the larger-scaled world, the universe. My dream at that time was to work at NASA, only to be disappointed after knowing that only U.S. citizens can work there.

My intellectual learning and curiosity have stopped for a long period of time as I quit studying in Korea and entered a high school in the U.S. Therefore, when I saw this course title in an email about First Year Seminars, it felt like revisiting the target of my yearning. I have very shallow knowledge on the space exploration projects, so I thought studying the most recent project on Mars would expand my view.

As Professor said in class, it is very sad that we don't have any clue about the first half of the earth's history. Since Mars is quite desolate and not very energetic or lively compared to the earth right now, it might contain hints to figuring out the early life of our planet earth. It somehow feels like there should be quite a few similarities between the two planets. I hope to gain better understanding not only of the mystery world of Mars and the solar system, but also of our own planet.

 

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